Pubblicato il 12/11/12e aggiornato il

Textual description of firstImageUrl

Vittorio Matteo Corcos | La Belle Époque





A Reassessment of Corcos, Sensuality and Subtlety Intact

- The New York Times, article by Roderick Conway Morris A Reassessment of Corcos, Sensuality and Subtlety Intact, Oct. 7, 2014

The Jewish community of the Tuscan seaport of Livorno produced two notable artists whose lives spanned the 19th and 20th centuries: Vittorio Corcos and Amedeo Modigliani.
Corcos enjoyed a long and prosperous international career, dying at the age of 74 in 1933. Modigliani* struggled to sell his work and died little known at the age of 35 in 1920.
But whereas Modigliani* is now one of the most famous of 20th-century artists, Corcos, outside of Italy at least, is virtually forgotten. One reason is that Corcos’s uninspiringly conventional society and royal portraits have obscured the fact that he also produced some genuinely idiosyncratic images.

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

The last retrospective devoted to Corcos was staged in his birthplace in 1997 and briefly traveled on to Florence. Now, the Palazzo Zabarella in Padua is staging a reassessment of Corcos. Curated by Ilaria Taddei, Fernando Mazzocca and Carlo Sisi, the show, "Corcos: Dreams of the Belle Époque" (through Dec. 14), contains more than 100 works, 27 of which are being shown publicly for the first time. Eighteen more have not been exhibited for at least half a century.
Like many other boys born to patriotic Italian families in 1859, Vittorio owed his name to the triumph of Victor Emmanuel II and his French allies over the Austrian occupiers of northern Italy in the Second Italian War of Independence.
Livorno was the only Italian town with a Jewish population that had never been confined to a ghetto but, along with their co-religionists in other parts of the peninsula, they saw in the expulsion of foreign autocrats and the reunification of Italy the key to their full, long-term emancipation.
Vittorio, a naturally gifted artist, was admitted at 16 directly into the second year of Florence’s Accademia di Belle Arti. Two years later, financed by a grant from his hometown, he went on to Naples, where he was taken under the wing of the city’s leading artist, Domenico Morelli*, who opened up to the young painter new literary and musical vistas. In 1880, the purchase of one of Corcos’s pictures by King Umberto I supplied just enough cash for him to make the journey to Paris.

The first two rooms on the ground floor of the exhibition offer a tour d’horizon of the first two decades or so of Corcos’s career and the various genres he essayed: from portraits, including one of his wife, Emma, as well as those of a number of Italian writers, artists and intellectuals, to Parisian streets and parks, and coastal scenes in France and Tuscany.
Among the portraits are those of Giosuè Carducci, the poet and first Italian Nobel Prize winner, the critic Enrico Panzacchi, Augusto Vecchi, who wrote maritime stories under the name "Jack La Bolina", the journalist Pietro Coccoluto Ferrigni, who signed himself "Yorick", the painters Francesco Gioli and Silvestro Lega*, and the influential Jewish publisher Emilio Treves.
Corcos demonstrated an early mastery in rendering fabrics and flesh tones, his technique becoming increasingly refined so that some of his later portraits take on an almost photographic quality.
On arriving in Paris, Corcos went to introduce himself to Giuseppe De Nittis* who, along with Giovanni Boldini, was the most successful of the Italian artists that had migrated to Paris.
Corcos’s reception was aided by the fact that the gourmet De Nittis* mistakenly thought that he had seen him at a splendid lunch in Naples the year before. De Nittis* held a regular salon, to which the younger artist was now invited, enabling him to meet Degas, Manet*, Caillebotte*, Daudet, Edmond de Goncourt and other leading artistic figures of the day.
De Nittis's* influence on Corcos is evident in a number of the canvases in the first section on the first floor of the palazzo: "In Paris: Painting Modern Life".
In fact, two of these canvases - "Tranquil Hours", of a mother reading on a park bench, and a fashionably dressed "Woman with a Dog" - later had their original signatures painted out and replaced with that of De Nittis* to increase their value, but have now been restored to their true author.
Through De Nittis*, Corcos was introduced to the Maison Goupil, founded in 1829 by Adolphe Goupil and the German art dealer Joseph Henry Rittner. This highly commercial operation became Goupil, Vibert and Cie during the 1840s, opened branches in London and New York, and marketed pictures and prints calculated to appeal to the bourgeoisie and the new moneyed classes.
Decorative portraits of enticing young women was one of Goupil’s principal lines, and Corcos’s technical skills in reproducing luxurious women’s fashions and the milky-white and subtly blushing complexions of the young ladies wearing them made him an ideal supplier. There are over a dozen examples of these gift-wrapped young women on display, with such titles as "Une élégante", "Girl in White", "Young Woman Walking in the Bois de Boulogne" and "The Modern Virgin".
Corcos was also adept at infusing these paintings with a fresh-faced sexuality without exceeding the bounds of bourgeois decorum, and Goupil admiringly described him as a painter who was "chastely impure".
Corcos signed a contract with Goupil, which relieved him of financial concerns, and he continued to supply the gallery with pictures long after he returned to Italy in 1886 and opened a studio in Florence.
Meanwhile, Corcos became increasingly in demand as a painter of portraits of aristocratic and haute-bourgeois Italian women - a score of which are on show in a section called "The Triumph of the Fashionable Portrait".
Yet during the last decade of the 19th and first of the 20th centuries, Corcos intermittently produced some unusual images of dangerously independent women that now constitute the most distinctive of his works.
The first of these, "Dreams*", which was an instant succès de scandale when it was first exhibited in Florence in 1896, features a young woman, casually posed in advanced, loose-fitting dress, sitting on a bench beside a pile of well-thumbed "yellow books" (almost certainly of a risqué variety), who fixes the viewer with an enigmatic, sphinx-like gaze.
Even more challenging was his "Magdalen" for the modern age - a veritable femme fatale, standing in a sculptor’s studio at the foot of a marble statue of the crucified Christ, dressed in a high-collared, tight-waisted black dress, with her hand on one hip and a unwavering look that suggests a defiant air of self-possession and unrepentance.
This was followed in 1899 by another flame-haired vamp, the "Morfinomane", a sister picture to Giovanni Boldini’s daringly sexy portrait of "Lady Colin Campbell" of 1894, but with the added implications of narcotic-fueled hedonism.
Regrettably, Corcos’s canvas, now in a private collection in the United States, is absent from the current exhibition. But the show does provide the chance to see the most suggestive of all these pictures, from around 1910: the innocuously titled but broodingly sensual "Reading by the Sea". | By Roderick Conway Morrisoct. 7, 2014 © The New York Times Company

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933

Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933



















































Vittorio Matteo Corcos 1859-1933
















Còrcos Vittorio Matteo - Figlio di Isach è di Giuditta Baquis, nacque a Livorno il 4 ottobre del 1859.
Egli si indirizzò subito allo studio del disegno iscrivendosi all'Accademia di belle arti di Firenze, ove dal 1846 era professore un, altro livornese famoso, E. Pollastrini. La probabile insoddisfazione nei confronti di quel rigoroso epigono del purismo, che spesso si inquietava con l'allievo a causa della sua troppo spregiudicata maniera di tradurre il "vero", velocemente e senza correzioni, convinse il Còrcos a intraprendere un viaggio a Napoli, dove D. Morelli attuava una pittura più "diretta" e complicata da inquietudini formali e letterarie. Risalgono a questo primo periodo, fra il 1878-1879, la suggestione orientale dell'Arabo in preghiera, acquistato dal re e oggi al Museo di Capodimonte, e Il boia raffigurato a grandezza naturale, ricordato dal Targioni Tozzetti (1929) come "pittura forte, dalle pennellate larghe, sicura, disegnata magistralmente, evidentemente ispirata da Ribera".

Nel 1880 il Còrcos, su suggerimento del Morelli, si trasferì a Parigi dove, nell'ambiente del famoso mercante d'arte Goupil, al quale si legò con un contratto per quindici anni, avvicinò Boldini*, De Nittis e forse Palizzi e Meissonnier. Contemporaneamente frequentò, in maniera saltuaria, lo studio di Léon Bonnat, il ricercatissimo ritrattista dell'alta borghesia parigina che, oltre ad indicargli la via di una maestà formale non disgiunta dai contemporanei suggerimenti della fotografia, era in grado di trasmettergli l'immagine dell'artista di successo, assediato nel suo studio dalle pressanti richieste di una élite, incline a farsi divinizzare.
Al Salon del 1881 il Còrcos presentò un quadro di grandi dimensioni e di soggetto parigino, A la brasserie, che ottenne un notevole consenso, poi ripetuto al Salon del 1882 con Rêverie, Lune de miel, L'anniversaire e a quello del 1885 con un grande Ritratto di dama, molto lodato dalla critica.
La vocazione mondana del pittore, soprannominato in quel momento significativamente "peintre des jolies femmes", si esprimeva appunto in ritratti femminili assai vicini allo stile di Boldini* e di De Nittis* (Fata bruna, Fata bionda), in paesaggi ove l'esercizio poetico degli impressionisti è tradotto in più facile armonia di colori e di luce, in soggetti sportivi o temi graziosi particolarmente richiesti dalla clientela di Goupil (Les papillons, Age. ingrat, Le nouveau né, L'amateur des estampes).

Nel 1886 il Còrcos ritornò in Italia per il servizio militare, partecipando nello stesso anno all'Esposizione di Livorno, ove erano presenti quasi tutti i macchiaioli insieme ai pittori meridionali, romani e lombardi.
Nel 1887, dopo essersi convertito dalla religione ebraica al cattolicesimo, sposò Emma Ciabatti vedova Rotigliano e si stabilì definitivamente a Firenze, che abbandonerà solo per occasionali viaggi di lavoro a Londra e Parigi, e dove, accanto agli ultimi cenacoli dei macchiaioli, si imporrà per la sua ormai acquisita abilità di ritrattista.

All'Esposizione di Firenze del 1896, che riuniva a Fattori*, Signorini*, Borrani, Cabianca e Nomellini* anche Monet, Bonnat, Gérôme*, Puvis de Chavannes*, Burne-Jones*, Alma-Tadema*, fece particolarmente rumore il quadro del Còrcos intitolato Sogni* (Roma, Galleria nazionale d'arte moderna), ritenuto troppo spregiudicato per la posa disinvolta con cui la giovinetta ritratta asseconda la sua immaginazione, ma tanto più segretamente apprezzato dall'ambiguo moralismo del pubblico fin de siècle, che lo volle riprodotto addirittura in una cartolina illustrata.

Della diffusione dei quadri del Còrcos offre del resto un'utile testimonianza proprio l'Archivio fotografico Alinari, cui è necessario rivolgere l'attenzione per completare visivamente il corpus delle opere del pittore, quasi tutte in collezioni private e, il più delle volte, disperse.

La prevalenza dei contenuti sulle esigenze dello stile (Rupture, Primo dolore, Le due vergini, Morfinomane), oltre a giustificare il successo e la grande diffusione di quelle riproduzioni, è l'elemento che contribuisce soprattutto a collocare la personalità dei pittore entro il clima artistico e letterario dell'Italia umbertina, che il Còrcos avvicinò per la sua fama di ritrattista e per il tramite della moglie, amica di intellettuali e poeti come D'Annunzio e Pascoli. La società di cui Emma era parte gravitava intorno al cenacolo del Marzocco, il giornale che si colloca fra il solenne declino del Carducci e l'atmosfera tra letteraria e galante determinata dalla presenza di D'Annunzio alla Capponcina. Il Còrcos divenne il pittore ufficiale di tale società, etemandone i valori in ritratti sapientemente "corretti" e corrispondenti più spesso ai dettami delle convenzioni estetiche del momento che non alla effettiva sostanza del personaggio ritratto (Contessa Annina Morosini, Contessa Nerina Volpi di Misurata, Lina Cavalieri, Iole Moschini Biaggini, Contessa di St. Roman).

Come confidava lo stesso Còrcos al Targioni Tozzetti: "Il ritratto di un uomo deve sempre rappresentare con evidenza la posizione sociale che esso occupa nel mondo. Un ritratto di donna deve sempre renderla provocante, anche se ottantenne". "Chi non conosce la pittura di Vittorio Corcos? - scriveva Ojetti sul Corriere della Sera il18 nov. 1933 - Attenta, levigata, meticolosa, ottimistica: donne e uomini come desiderano d'essere, non come sono". CòrcosE. Oppo, (1948): "Una pittura chiara, dolce, liscia, ben finita: la seta, seta, la paglia, paglia, il legno, legno c'le scarpine lucide di copale, lucide come le so fare soltanto io, diceva Corcos".
Ancora Ojetti nel 1928: "Giura di aver inventato una macchinetta per far le perle da quando dovette ridipingere tutti i vezzi della contessa Canevaro perché alla cliente sembrarono troppo piccoli: e una specie di pettine per far le righe sui pantaloni a righe. Cinico sì, ma ci soffre..".. (I Taccuini, 1954).

Oltre che autore di un famoso ritratto di G. Carducci, frequentatore del salotto letterario di famiglia, il. Còrcos fu impegnato in ritrattì ufficiali retrospettivi (Ritratto di Garibaldi per il municipio di Livorno), in "istantanee" di importanti personaggi contemporanei (A Barbera, E. Treves, G. Biagi, Mons. G. Bonomelli, P. Rajna, G. Puccini, P. Mascggni, S. Lega, Yorick) e di ricchi committenti stranieri (M.me Godillot, Mme d'Yendlle, Cipriano Godebski, Alice Barley, Jane Cru Ewing, Jack La Bolina), in incarichi assai clamorosi, come i ritratti di Carlos e Amalia del Portogallo (1904), dell'imperatore Guglielmo II con l'imperatrice (1904), della Regina Margherita (1922).

Egli stesso, in un articolo sul Marzocco del 10 genn. 1926, rievoca l'incontro con la sovrana, esponendo il metodo compositivo adottato nel concepire l'ambientazione, metodo che venne considerato innovatore nell'ambito della esecuzione d'un ritratto ufficiale: "... in quei giorni di continuata convivenza colla Regina avevo avuto agio dì osservare le tendenze, le predilezioni, le attitudini, i gesti, e tosto germogliò in me l'idea di completare il ritratto includendovi quegli attributi che appunto ne avrebbero rivelato il carattere, rinunciando a far campeggiare la figura sul solito fondo unito ed asfaltoso, oppure sul leggendario svolazzo di velluto cremisi con le inevitabili nappe dorate. E pensai invece dipingervi oggetti o cose che rivelassero all'osservatore le nobili preferenze di Lei, ponendo su di un mobile in secondo piano una immagine bronzea della Vergine del Sansovino, e più sopra a luce bassissima un antico paesaggio fiammingo, e giù a portata di mano libri classici e riviste, a rappresentare l'amore delle arti, la profonda cultura, e la cristiana carità dell'adorata scomparsa".

Gli interessi letterari del Còrcos si manifestarono, in margine alla sua attività di pittore, in alcuni articoli su Il Marzocco e La Tribuna;in un volume di novelle (Madamoiselle Le Prince, Livorno 1901); in conferenze di vario genere, fra cui una importante commemorazione di T. Signorini, tenuta nel 1904 alla fiorentina Società Leonardo Da Vinci. Collaboratore di giornali anche per la parte grafica sin dal tempo del suo primo soggiorno parigino (Le Figaro, L'Illustrazzione italiana), il Còrcos estese la sua facile vena immaginativa anche all'illustrazione di libri (A "Mezzocolle". Storia semplice, di F. Vanzi-Mussini, Firenze 1892, p. 311, partecipando per un breve periodo ai progetti editoriali di G. Pascoli, che lo aveva accomunato a Nomellini e De Carolis nella pianificazione decorativa dei propri volumi. Per l'interessamento della moglie, la "gentile ignota" della corrispondenza pascoliana, il Còrcos pubblicherà sul Marzocco (4 febbr. 1900) il disegno In processione, ipotesi per una copertina dei Poemetti, e invierà Il mendico, altro disegno ispirato alla omonima poesia compresa nei Canti di Castolvecchio, che però il Pascoli stesso rifiuterà.

Nel 1913 donò agli Uffizi il proprio Autoritratto per la Galleria dei ritratti. Nei Taccuini di Ojetti, in cui si ricorda la morte del pittore avvenuta a Firenze l'8 nov. 1933, una nota del 15 agosto 1928 sottolinea le ultime commissioni ufficiali ottenute da Còrcos in pieno Novecento, tra cui il ritratto di Benito Mussolini: "Pel Togni di Brescia ha dipinto quest'anno dieci ritratti, e adesso farà Mussolini e Turati". | di Carlo Sisi © Treccani




Fai una donazione con con Paypal me

Archivio

Follow by Email