Visualizzazione post con etichetta Musée du Louvre. Mostra tutti i post
Visualizzazione post con etichetta Musée du Louvre. Mostra tutti i post
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Antonio Canova | Psyché et l'Amour, 1788-1793

"Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss" is a sculpture by Antonio Canova first commissioned in 1787 by Colonel John Campbell. It is regarded as a masterpiece of Neoclassical sculpture, but shows the mythological lovers at a moment of great emotion, characteristic of the emerging movement of Romanticism.
It represents the god Cupid in the height of love and tenderness, immediately after awakening the lifeless Psyche with a kiss. The story of Cupid and Psyche is taken from Lucius Apuleius' Latin novel The Golden Ass and was popular in art.
- Joachim Murat acquired the first or prime version (pictured) in 1800. After his death the statue entered the Louvre Museum in Paris, France in 1824;


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Lorenzo Bartolini | Dircé, 1834 | Musée du Louvre, Parigi


Ingres Jean-Auguste-Dominique (1780-1867)
Portrait of Lorenzo Bartolini, Musée du Louvre
Dircé (/ˈdɜrsiː/; Ancient Greek: Δίρκη, pronounced Dirke, modern Greek pronunciation Dirki, meaning "double" or "cleft") was the wife of Lycus in Greek mythology, and aunt to Antiope whom Zeus impregnated. Antiope fled in shame to King Epopeus of Sicyon, but was brought back by Lycus through force, giving birth to the twins Amphion and Zethus on the way. Dirce hated Antiope and treated her cruelly after Lycus gave Antiope to her; until Antiope, in time, escaped.